home   |   А-Я   |   A-Z   |   меню

Harris Robert

Imperium

Imperium Оценка: 4.3 (35)
Annotation:
From the bestselling author of Pompeii comes the first volume in an exciting new trilogy set in ancient Rome an imaginary biography of Cicero, Rome 's first and greatest politician. Of all the great figures of Roman times, none was more fascinating or attractive than Marcus Cicero. A brilliant lawyer and orator, a famous wit and philosopher, he launched himself at the age of twenty-seven into the violent, treacherous world of Roman politics. Cicero was determined to attain imperium, the supreme power in the state. Beside him at all times in his struggle to reach the top the office of Consul was his confidential secretary, Tiro. An accomplished man, Tiro was the inventor of shorthand and the author of numerous books, including a famous life of Cicero, unfortunately lost in the Dark Ages. In Imperium, Robert Harris recreates Tiro's vanished masterpiece, recounting in vivid detail the story of Cicero 's rise to power, from radical young lawyer to first citizen of Rome, competing with men such as Pompey, Caesar, Crassus and Cato. Harris's Cicero is an immensely sympathetic figure. In his introduction to this imaginary memoir, Tato states: Cicero was unique in the history of the Roman republic in that he pursued supreme power with no resources to help him apart from his own talent & All he had was his voice, and by sheer effort of will, he turned it into the most famous voice in the world. Ever since Walter Scott wrote Waverley, the dominant tradition of the historical novel has been one of obsessive realism. Why this should be so is no great mystery. By and large, only novelists who take drug culture as their theme, or perhaps a poverty-stricken upbringing in Ireland, feel under greater pressure to demonstrate the authenticity of their material. This, for historical novelists who do not push their settings too far back in time, can often prove a positive inspiration. Robert Harris, writing about Bletchley Park in his thriller Enigma, was evoking a period when the fashion in English fiction had itself been broadly realist. Not only did this provide him with a ready supply of juicy period detail, it also justified the recycling of it. A genre, after all, is as much a product of its time as anything else. A novel set in 1940s England has every right to be as realist as it likes.But what about fiction set in the more distant past? We have plenty of literature from the pre-modern era, but it is often of limited value to writers working in the realist tradition. Indeed, in most periods of ancient history, there isn't much of a reality to be realist about. The most surefire solution to this problem, because also the most brutal, is simply to embrace anachronism what might be termed the Up Pompeii approach. The modern exemplar of this is Lindsey Davis, and her hugely entertaining Falco novels. Flavian Rome may provide the backdrop, but there is never any doubt that Falco himself, for all his togas, is a thoroughly modern private eye. Indeed, since the genre of the detective novel is a modern one, it is hard to imagine what a credibly ancient private eye might be like.Harris, whose first three novels were set in the 20th century, played things similarly safe when he too moved back in time to Flavian Rome. Pompeii, a thriller about the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, was essentially a blending of Chinatown and any number of disaster movies. As a page-turner, it was predictably gripping; but as a recreation of the 1st century AD it had inevitable limitations. How, after all, was a contemporary genre supposed to offer an authentic vision of a period to which it was profoundly alien? This is a question to which Harris has evidently been giving much thought; and in his new novel, Imperium, he presents us with his solution.The setting, like that of Pompeii, is classical. A century and a half before the eruption of Vesuvius, the Roman world was administered not by an emperor but as a republic. Rival players competed for the fr

hide Table of Contents

  1. Robert Harris Imperium
  2. Part One. Senator
  3. 79 B.C.-70 B.C.
  4. Roll I
  5. Roll II
  6. Roll III
  7. Roll IV
  8. Roll V
  9. Roll VI
  10. Roll VII
  11. Roll VIII
  12. Roll IX
  13. Part Two. Praetorian
  14. 68 B.C.-64 B.C.
  15. Roll X
  16. Roll XI
  17. Roll XII
  18. Roll XIII
  19. Roll XIV
  20. Roll XV
  21. Roll XVI
  22. Roll XVII
  23. Roll XVIII
  24. Author ’s Note
  25. About the Author


Rate this book  


Reviews


Enter your name:     Rate this book

Enter your comments or review:


получать комментарии о книге Imperium на e-mail

Anti-spam code Anti spam Capcha